The following projects and representatives from each project will be presenting on Thursday, March 7th in the morning at WebWise 2013.  Extended project descriptions can be viewed by clicking on the project’s name in the list below:

Wikipedia and Libraries, What’s the Connection?
StoryCorps @ your library
The Nicholas V. Artamonoff Collection, Dumbarton Oaks
Northern Lights: The Stories of Minnesota’s Past
HiTech: The Road to A STEM Career
21-Tech
Building Social Relationships and Bridging Social Capital: An Inclusive Approach to Immigrant Civic Engagement within Libraries Demonstration Project
GIS for Public Gardens
An Integrated Framework for Assessing the Vulnerability of Plant Diversity to Climate Change

 

Wikipedia and Libraries, What’s the Connection?
OCLC Research – San Mateo, CA
http://www.oclc.org/research.html
Presenter: Merrilee Proffit

It used to be that if you wanted information or answers to questions, you went to a library. In an era of increased reliance on major network hubs, information seekers increasingly turn to the web for answers. Therefore it is vital that libraries and archives ensure that their collections, or information about their collections, are easily discoverable on the open web. As the 6th most accessed website globally, Wikipedia is a natural place for cultural heritage institutions to expose their collections. Wikipedia articles receive a lot of web love: they are highly ranked by search engines; snippets from pages are incorporated into Google’s Knowledge Graph, and are pulled in by services like Facebook, filling in missing content. How can libraries and archives mesh with Wikipedia? This session will detail how cultural heritage institutions are connecting researchers to unique materials through Wikipedia, put a spotlight on the special role library data can play in Wikipedia, examine how Wikipedia data may be useful to libraries and scholarly institutions, introduce Wikipedia’s GLAM-Wiki initiative, and talk about ways that information professionals can work collaboratively with the World’s Largest Free Encyclopedia.
[Return to the full list of projects]

StoryCorps @ your library
StoryCorps – Brooklyn, NY
http://www.programminglibrarian.org/storycorps/
Presenters: Virginia Millington, StoryCorps, and Angela Hanshaw, ALA

StoryCorps @ your library is a two-year program created by the American Library Association’s Public Programs Office in partnership with StoryCorps, funded by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services. Libraries selected to take part in the program will receive customized training in interview collection, a set of professional recording equipment, and the ability to add interview materials and metadata directly to StoryCorps’ database. In addition, libraries will be able to access interview content for programmatic, educational, or cataloging purposes, as well as ensure that interviews recorded as part of the partnership are archived for posterity at the Library of Congress. The program is designed to encourage multi-format public programming on broad themes of oral narrative and local and family history that may be tailored to specific locales, holidays, or heritage months. StoryCorps @ your library will serve public libraries as they seek to better serve and engage their patrons and to record stories that reflect the diversity and scope of their communities.
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The Nicholas V. Artamonoff Collection
Dumbarton Oaks – Washington, D.C.
http://icfa.doaks.org/collections/artamonoff/
Presenter: Shalimar Fojas White

In the early 1960s, the Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection acquired a superb collection of 500 negatives from an amateur photographer named Nicholas Artamonoff. Dating from 1935-1945, these compelling images document ancient and Byzantine sites in Istanbul and Western Asia Minor, many of which have since been completely destroyed, severely damaged, or fundamentally transformed. While a few images had been published, the collection and the photographer remained largely unknown. Starting in 2010, staff at the Image Collections and Fieldwork Archives (ICFA) at Dumbarton Oaks undertook a project to digitize the negatives and create an online exhibit for Artamonoff’s work. To do so, ICFA staff had to establish the photographer’s identity. Unfortunately, the only clues were the negatives themselves, a set of contact prints, and a second-hand story that Artamonoff had been the son of the Russian ambassador to Turkey.

This demonstration will describe how an interdisciplinary team – consisting of a scholar in Byzantine Studies, an art librarian, and an archivist – used the search for Artamonoff’s identity to create an effective proof-of-concept project for future digital humanities initiatives. ICFA staff partnered with librarians, archivists, and scholars to identify related materials in repositories and cultural heritage institutions across the United States and Turkey. The project also provided educational opportunities for undergraduate and graduate interns, serving as a successful pilot project to develop partnerships with local universities and LIS programs. Together with ICFA staff, interns developed an online exhibit using the open-source web-publishing platform Omeka. This digital project enabled broader access to the collection and provided a tangible asset that was successfully used for outreach efforts and strategic communication.
[Return to the full list of projects]

Northern Lights: The Stories of Minnesota’s Past
Minnesota Historical Society – St. Paul, MN
http://www.mnhs.org/school/classroom/nl/index.htm
Presenter: Suzi Gran

Are you wondering how K-12 content providers are transitioning from a print world into today’s digital instructional landscape? One such provider, the Minnesota Historical Society, will demo its popular (and free) ipad app for 6th graders, Minnesota and the Civil War. The app represents exciting new possibilities for engaging students and putting collections into their hands. On the other hand, its creation also generates a host of challenging questions publishers must face: What format will best meet the needs of classrooms–ipad or browser based? How quickly are schools adopting new devices? What kind of teacher training is needed? What staffing changes are required to create a digital tool, as opposed to a printed book? How does a new product affect publisher expectations regarding mission and income generation?

An MHS Curriculum Specialist will share the development team’s experience exploring these and other questions. Our team includes professionals in three areas: web development, book production (both print and digital), and K-12 content. For the past 1.5 years, we have worked together to shape the future of Northern Lights: The Stories of Minnesota’s Past, the curriculum used statewide to teach required benchmarks in state history. Our institution wisely recognized the importance of combining talents of these groups. Without our varied perspectives, we never could have accomplished what’s been achieved so far. Alas, there is no one, end-all-be-all answer to the digital transition question. However, we are happy to share the the deep knowledge we have discovered–and are continuing to discover–along the way. Buckle up and join us for the ride!
[Return to the full list of projects]

HiTech: The Road to A STEM Career
Howard County Library System
http://www.hclibrary.org/hitech
Presenter: Angela Brade

A presentation of HCLS’s HiTech Initiative: As one of 12 recipients of the IMLS and MacArthur Foundation’s Digital Learning Labs Grant in 2011, HCLS successfully launched a Pilot digital learning lab and established an interactive digital media lab engaging youth ages 11-18 in hands-on experiences in core areas of digital technology including music, video, game and mobile app design. The success of the Pilot demonstrates the demand and growing need for this type of learning environment.
[Return to the full list of projects]

21-Tech
Children’s Museum of Houston – Houston, TX
http://21-Tech.org
Presenters: Cheryl Mccallum, Children’s Museum of Houston, *protected email* and Keith Ostfeld and Cecilia Garibay

The 21-Tech project team of five science centers has spent the past three years developing techniques for floor staff and volunteers to engage visitors using tablets (mostly iPads) as facilitation tools. Through multiple iterations, museum staff members have identified apps from the iTunes app market that lengthen, deepen, and/or extend visitor interactions with specific hands-on exhibits. This demonstration will examine the resulting techniques, tools and evaluation findings, which are also available through the project’s website, 21-Tech.org. Partners include the Children’s Museum of Houston (CMH), Lawrence Hall of Science, New York Hall of Science, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, and Sciencenter. Three phases of evaluation (to date) have been led by the Garibay Group. The 21-Tech project director from CMH, Cheryl McCallum, Ed.D., will be leading the demonstration in collaboration with CMH’s co-project director Keith Ostfeld and project evaluator Cecilia Garibay, Ph.D.
[Return to the full list of projects]

Building Social Relationships and Bridging Social Capital: An Inclusive Approach to Immigrant Civic Engagement within Libraries Demonstration Project
Hartford Public Library – Hartford, CT
http://www.hplct.org/library-services/immigration-citizenship/community-civic-participation
Presenter: Homa Naficy, Hartford Public Library

Hartford Public Library’s IMLS Leadership Demonstration Project goes beyond providing services directly to immigrants, such as citizenship and ESL classes. It also demonstrates how libraries can involve the receiving community in support of immigrants at a level where they can feel more connected to the broader community and become civically engaged. The project employs two interconnected and complementary goals to address the critical need for immigrant civic integration. One strategy trains volunteers to become cultural navigators who are then matched with families where they work together on library based activities during a set period of time. These mentors are integral in easing the transition of newly arrived immigrants into Hartford. The second strategy is Community Dialogues designed to engage immigrants and the receiving community in dialogue on a topic of mutual concern that then lead to a plan of action. Both these strategies allow for relationship building between people of like and unlike backgrounds which has been noted in the field as one of the key ingredients for promoting civic integration. The project demonstrates the irreplaceable role of public libraries in community relationship building and immigrant civic integration.
[Return to the full list of projects]

GIS for Public Gardens
UC Davis Arboretum – Davis, CA
http://www.apgg.org
Presenter: Brian Morgan

Geographic information systems (GIS) are quickly becoming the preferred method for managing, analyzing, and sharing collection information at museums, libraries, and public gardens worldwide. Once a tool only used by collection curators, GIS is now used for research, facilities and landscape management, design and planning, education and interpretation, and even fundraising and donor stewardship.

In this demonstration, the UC Davis Arboretum will share their IMLS funded work to develop a suite of tools and resources for the public garden community that are revolutionizing the way gardens operate. Topics will include a GIS data standard called the ArcGIS Public Garden Data Model, a web map application for sharing collection information called Collection Researcher, a comprehensive GIS training program, and an online community called the Alliance for Public Gardens GIS.

No matter which type of institution you work with, or what your role is within it, this session will provide you with the conceptual background on how you can put GIS to work for you!
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An Integrated Framework for Assessing the Vulnerability of Plant Diversity to Climate Change
Missouri Botanical Garden – St. Louis, MO
Website Under Development
Presenter: Matthew A. Albrecht

Plants are the foundation on which all life depends, regulating global and local climate, controlling erosion, purifying air and water, providing a viable habitat for all species, and comprising the basis of our food supply, medicines, and other valuable products. While most scientists consider many plant species to be seriously at risk of extinction in the near future, efforts to safeguard plant diversity are impeded by a lack of basic information on key issues concerning climate change impacts on plants. The Missouri Botanical Garden will develop and test a generalizable, replicable approach to develop scientifically-based protocols to avert the loss of plant species from climate change. The goals of the project are to assess the response of rare plant species from the southeastern United States to climate change scenarios using species distribution models (SDM), identify priority species that are vulnerable to climate change, and experimentally test the degree of adaptation in selected plant species to current and future climates. The project will demonstrate to botanical gardens and arboreta working in regional conservation a replicable model that assesses climate change impacts on plant diversity and advances climate change research through innovative, forward-thinking changes to and integration of existing methodologies and tools.
[Return to the full list of projects]